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Old 11-16-2008, 03:09 PM   #7
Richard Herley
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Posts: 200
Karma: 250001
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Hampshire, England
Device: Sony Reader PRS-500, iPod Touch
I second Wuthering Heights.

Here are some other suggestions:

Wilkie Collins - The Woman in White
Victorian detective story; feisty heroine and excellent villain!

Joseph Conrad - Heart of Darkness
Not very long, a work of genius which bears close analysis and discussion

Joseph Conrad - Lord Jim
One of the few Conrad novels I haven't got to yet - said to be one of his best

Fyodor Dostoevsky - The Gambler
Novelette length, hair-raising plot, wonderfully funny and perceptive. It was itself dictated by Dostoevsky in record time, to pay off a gambling debt

F. Scott Fitzgerald - The Great Gatsby
I haven't read this one - it's very well regarded

Victor Hugo - Les Miserables
Long but colourful and involving novel with very sympathetc protagonist

Henry James - Washington Square
Chilling story about the damage an overbearing father can do, set in 19th century America

Jerome K. Jerome - Three Men in a Boat
Very funny and English, just the thing for the holiday season; but not as light as an initial reading suggests

Franz Kafka - Metamorphosis
A long short story, one of the most famous ever written, and deservedly so; also bears any amount of scrutiny and discussion. Fascinating stuff

Katherine Mansfield - The Garden Party and Other Stories
I've never read any of hers, but this is supposed to be excellent

Mary Shelley - Frankenstein
I'm ashamed to say I've never read this. Apparently it works on all kinds of levels

Ivan Turgenev - Fathers and Sons
One of my favourite 19th century Russians. I haven't read this one

Kurt Vonnegut - 2R02B
Neither have I read this, nor any Vonnegut, a gap I'd like to fill

H. G. Wells - The Time Machine
Novella, one of the earliest SF tales. Adventure story, scary in places. Under the hood all sorts of interesting things are being said, not least about the British class system in the 19th century

P. G. Wodehouse - My Man Jeeves
I haven't read this one either and would like to.

All of these are in the MobileRead library, though not all are available in every format.
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