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Old 08-07-2014, 02:05 AM   #12
crich70
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sl42 View Post
On the fate of the wine bottle:

Though exposed to the vacuum of space, the wine bottle is a rigid
container which will not flex and expand therefore the contents will
experience minimal change in pressure, thus no boiling and out-gassing
from the wine and such. The bottle is a strong container and atmospheric
pressure is only about fourteen pounds per square inch, thus the apparent
increase in pressure when it is lobbed into the vacuum of space would be
the same. The weak point, of course, would be the cork which might be
pushed out, but we’ll assume that it is wired in place securely or that
this is a screw top with a strong cap. Then comes the issue of heat loss.
Space has, as noted above, no real “temperature” since there is no
atmosphere of enough density to matter. Further, there is no liquid or gas
in contact with the bottle to carry heat away by convection. Being in a
near perfect vacuum, the bottle is perfectly insulated though it still
will lose heat via radiation, and this will be a much slower process than
in a cold atmosphere. The wine would probably take longer to freeze lobbed
into the vacuum of space than if it were tossed out into the snow on a
sub-zero winter’s day down here. Probably the only point where things
would suddenly get very interesting would be when the bottle finally
smacked into the ship’s hull and shattered because then the liquid
droplets are exposed to vacuum and should begin rapidly boiling and
consequently dropping in temperature rapidly therefore producing bits of
ice which should survive even as most of the volume boils off.
Interesting. I guess it shows that common sense and reality aren't always the same. I don't recall seeing any ice in the scene (I think in Star Trek Generations) but the scene shifted just after the bottle shattered I think so the liquid didn't have time to boil away.
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