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Old 06-19-2014, 06:52 PM   #846
issybird
o saeclum infacetum
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twicefivemiles View Post
but the sheer length of the book overwhelms me sometimes.
I've been listening to the first volume of Shelby Foote's Civl War during my drive and while I'm enjoying it, it also feels like a feat of endurance. I bumped the speed up to 1.5X on the SmarterPlayer app just so I could get through the 37+ hours in about a month. It'll be a while before I queue up volume II.

Caro's The Power Broker isn't available as an ebook and I don't want to heft it, so when I saw it at Audible, I spent a credit on it. But 66 hours! I quail at the prospect. That's a lot of listening for one credit, though!

Quote:
Originally Posted by WT Sharpe View Post
This book of short stories is enjoyable, yet there is an irritating element present in many of them, and that is the not-so-hidden sermons contained within. Many of the villains in these tales are atheists. I don't mind the idea of a main character who is faithful to his own religious ideals, but in a work of fiction I prefer not being hit over the head with an author's religious or political viewpoints.
I suppose it goes with the territory of the proselytizing convert. It recalls to me how in Brideshead Revisited, Evelyn Waugh used a quote from one of the stories, The Queer Feet to describe the effect of grace on the lapsed and susceptible.
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