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Old 02-20-2014, 01:54 PM   #4
WT Sharpe
Grand Muckity-Muck
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I nominate The Worst Journey in the World by Apsley Cherry-Garrard. Not only does National Geographic say that of all the literature of polar travel, this is "the one to beat" (It's #1 on their list of adventure books), it's free at several locations.

Quote:
"The Worst Journey in the World, by Apsley Cherry-Garrard (1922) As War and Peace is to novels, so is The Worst Journey in the World to the literature of polar travel: the one to beat. The author volunteered as a young man to go to the Antarctic with Robert Falcon Scott in 1910; that, and writing this book, are the only things of substance he ever did in life. They were enough. The expedition set up camp on the edge of the continent while Scott waited to go for the Pole in the spring. But first, Cherry-Garrard and two other men set out on a midwinter trek to collect emperor penguin eggs. It was a heartbreaker: three men hauling 700 pounds (318 kilograms) of gear through unrelieved darkness, with temperatures reaching 50, 60, and 70 degrees below zero (-46, -51, and -57 degrees Celsius); clothes frozen so hard it took two men to bend them. But Cherry-Garrard's greater achievement was to imbue everything he endured with humanity and even humor. And—as when he describes his later search for Scott and the doomed South Pole team—with tragedy as well. His book earns its preeminent place on this list by captivating us on every level: It is vivid; it is moving; it is unforgettable."
— National Geographic Books, 2002.
Amazon US / Project Gutenberg

Last edited by WT Sharpe; 02-20-2014 at 02:05 PM.
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