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Old 02-13-2014, 02:14 PM   #4
6charlong
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Posts: 886
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Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: US
Device: Kindle, nook, Apple and Kobo
Is Jeff Bezos the only one in publishing who has read The Innovatorís Dilemma?

Amazon is the only publisher with a halfway serious campaign to promote independent authors (in fairness, they are the only one with the weight to get serious at this point). Amazonís Day One and Kindle Singles imprints promote short stories, essays and shorter nonfiction. They they use their visibility in book-selling to highlight successful independent authors and their works. They pay independent authors a fair share of the profit from their work too. It seems as though while Amazon is innovating the future of publishing the big publishing houses seem merely to concentrate on killing eBooks. The only place Amazon backs off from promoting innovation in publishing is in their failing to promote independent bookstores as well. At least there is Kobo to pick that up and who knows where it will lead.

Itís exciting to watch the evolution of publishing. What's next: emerging markets in professional editing services with room for independent editors to offer innovative pricing to attract and hold onto promising authors? Perhaps revised expectations for what agents can and should do in a market where having contacts in publishing houses is less important than having keen insights into marketing a book?

To me, it all looks to be good--or at least necessary--but I can't wait to see what happens when big publishing quits their rear guard approach to innovation and embraces the changes.
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