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Old 08-31-2013, 06:26 PM   #161
Difflugia
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Posts: 740
Karma: 7029506
Join Date: Sep 2012
Device: NOOK HD running CM10.1
Quote:
Originally Posted by Midnighthyperion View Post
hi I'm sorry for posting again but I'm replying to your post in hopes of you being notified through your account. Could you read my previous post? Thanks for your time
I saw the post, but the question you asked would have taken a little longer than the few Mobileread minutes I have during weekdays to post an adequate response. Your request is kind of like, "I'm standing at my stove with eggs, now tell me how to make Eggs Benedict."

OK, I'm assuming at this point that you are looking at a Linux screen on a computer and have the SD Card out of your Vox and in a USB card reader.

For the following procedure, you need to be the user "root" on your Linux computer. That means that you'll be giving yourself the ability to erase everything on your computer and possibly even wreck your hardware if you do something wrong. If you're not comfortable with that, STOP NOW.

Step 1: Find the device for your SD Card

We first need to know what device gets assigned to the SD Card when you plug it into your computer. At the terminal, type "tail -f /var/log/messages" and hit ENTER. Now insert the USB card reader with your SD Card in it. You should see something very similar to the following:

Code:
Aug 31 10:46:16 dungheap kernel: [  943.606509] usb 1-3: New USB device found, idVendor=058f, idProduct=6366
Aug 31 10:46:16 dungheap kernel: [  943.606524] usb 1-3: New USB device strings: Mfr=1, Product=2, SerialNumber=3
Aug 31 10:46:16 dungheap kernel: [  943.606534] usb 1-3: Product: Mass Storage Device
Aug 31 10:46:16 dungheap kernel: [  943.606542] usb 1-3: Manufacturer: Generic
Aug 31 10:46:16 dungheap kernel: [  943.606548] usb 1-3: SerialNumber: 058F63666433
Aug 31 10:46:16 dungheap kernel: [  943.608523] scsi7 : usb-storage 1-3:1.0
Aug 31 10:46:17 dungheap kernel: [  944.739719] scsi 7:0:0:0: Direct-Access     Multiple Card  Reader     1.00 PQ: 0 ANSI: 0
Aug 31 10:46:17 dungheap kernel: [  944.740466] sd 7:0:0:0: Attached scsi generic sg2 type 0
Aug 31 10:46:17 dungheap kernel: [  945.384600] sd 7:0:0:0: [sdb] 15523840 512-byte logical blocks: (7.94 GB/7.40 GiB)
Aug 31 10:46:17 dungheap kernel: [  945.385809] sd 7:0:0:0: [sdb] Write Protect is off
Aug 31 10:46:17 dungheap kernel: [  945.404538]  sdb: sdb1 sdb2 sdb3 < sdb5 sdb6 > sdb4
Aug 31 10:46:17 dungheap kernel: [  945.408295] sd 7:0:0:0: [sdb] Attached SCSI removable disk
For this output, the device that I want is sdb. If your output is different enough that you can't tell what device you need, then stop. Don't guess. My hard drive, for example is at sda. If I guessed wrong and used that device instead, I'd lose everything on my computer, including my recipe for Eggs Benedict.

Step 2: Make a backup

You can skip this step if you want, but if you do and something goes wrong, there's not much anyone can do to help. First, make sure that you're in your home directory on your Linux computer. The command "pwd" should show you something like "/home/midnighthyperion". Replacing sdb with the device you found earlier, run the following command.

Code:
dd if=/dev/sdb of=./vox_backup.img bs=512
This will take a long time to complete (twenty minutes to more than an hour depending on the speed of your computer's USB hardware). When it's done, you should have a file named "vox_backup.img" that's around 8GB. To restore the backup (or create a duplicate), put the SD Card in your card reader and run the following, again replacing sdb with your SD Card's device:

Code:
dd if=./vox_backup.img of=/dev/sdb bs=512
Step 3: Add su to the Android filesystem

For this step, you need to download the Android Superuser package from here. Get the latest ZIP package that includes both su and Superuser.apk. The latest ZIP is currently here. Unzip the file and find the files named "su" and "Superuser.apk" and copy them to your current directory.

Now you need to mount the filesystem on your SD Card. You'll need to have a mountpoint, so type "mkdir /mnt/vox" and hit enter. Then, run the following, once again replacing sdb with your SD Card's device:

Code:
mount -t ext4 /dev/sdb1 /mnt/vox
The following will put "su" and "Superuser.apk" in the right places and set the "su" permissions correctly.

Code:
cp Superuser.apk /mnt/vox/app
cp su /mnt/vox/bin
chmod 6755 /mnt/vox/bin/su
Now umount the SD Card.

Code:
umount /mnt/vox
The SD Card can now be put back into the Vox and will be rooted when you reboot. Root won't survive a factory restore, but mine hasn't spontaneously restored itself since I stopped deleting random things out of /system/app.

Having root on your Vox means that you can inadvertantly break things there, too, but you can always restore from your backup to get back to a clean state. Just keep in mind that the backup that you created has whatever personal information that you've entered into your Vox, so don't upload it to the Interwebs or anything.
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