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Old 08-27-2013, 07:38 AM   #4
HarryT
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The problem with the current system is that copyright infringement is, in most cases, a civil, rather than a criminal, offence, and that means that "justice" is outside the reach of everyone except the largest of companies. If I find that someone has uploaded a pirated copy of my software to a web site, then even if I know the username of the uploader on the site, there's absolutely nothing that I can do about it. I can't afford the legal costs to go to court to get a court order to force the site to reveal the identity of the uploader, or the cost of a private prosecution to do something about it even if I did know their identity.

I don't know what the answer is, or whether this BREIN group has any good ideas to solve the problem, but from the viewpoint of the content creator (and don't make the mistake of thinking that all content creators are large companies - they certainly aren't) there is a very real problem with the current judicial system.
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