View Single Post
Old 07-18-2013, 02:47 AM   #8
Rev. Bob
Guru
Rev. Bob ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Rev. Bob ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Rev. Bob ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Rev. Bob ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Rev. Bob ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Rev. Bob ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Rev. Bob ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Rev. Bob ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Rev. Bob ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Rev. Bob ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.Rev. Bob ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.
 
Rev. Bob's Avatar
 
Posts: 734
Karma: 4005200
Join Date: Feb 2013
Device: Kobo Glo, Kindle Touch
Quote:
Originally Posted by RobertJSawyer View Post
I've been using a Kobo Glo for a while now and today added a 16GB Micro SD card. Is there a way to move my existing Kobo library from the device's main memory to the card without manually deleting and reinstalling each book?
I have the same hardware and will gladly share my techniques, which don't involve any specialized software.

Unfortunately, as has already been noted, you can't get the device to automatically download new purchases to the card. I wish there were, but it's just not an option.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RobertJSawyer
I'd like to have the whole library on the card so that I can just swap the card into another device if I upgrade my hardware, and so that the library will survive a factory reset. I can't find anything in the Kobo documentation about this.
First and foremost, realize that you're looking at three groups of ebooks in your device's library:

1. Books you've bought from the Kobo store and have downloaded to the device, typically through the sync mechanism (directly via wi-fi or indirectly via the desktop app and a USB connection) or the device/store interface.

2. DRM-protected books that you've sideloaded. These are a special headache, as the device and the computer that downloaded those books both have to be authorized with the same Adobe ID. (That's the only way the decryption will work properly.)

3. Unprotected books that you've "sideloaded" onto the device, for which DRM is not a concern.

At this point, there are two paths: The Approved Path and The Illegal Path. The latter boils down to stripping the DRM from all of your purchases, thus eliminating the middle category (and, if you're so inclined, the first as well) altogether. That involves using your computer to download your purchased files, DRM-stripping software on that computer to unlock them, the Kobo desktop (or iOS/Android) app to "delete" them from your cloud*, and then treating everything as one big library of unprotected ebooks that you can manipulate at will. What remains below is the former option.

* This deletion removes them from "Books I'm Reading" (the auto-download list) but not "Books I've Purchased" (the complete list). Note that using "delete" on the Kobo website is NOT the same thing; that takes the books off of BOTH lists, which you do NOT want to do.

Step one, if all your books are either in the Kobo cloud ("Reading") or on your computer, is just to factory-reset your device and blow away your old database. This will destroy any shelving data for sideloaded books (2 and 3 above), but that's going to happen anyway unless you use dedicated software like Calibre; that's part of the tradeoff here. Once you set up your Kobo and Adobe authorizations and your wi-fi network, it's a question of reloading the books.

The first category is easy to deal with - just sync with the Kobo servers. If the initial mass download is interrupted, the "missing" books will show up as "archived" with an arrow-in-circle icon on their covers, giving you the option to download them one at a time. (There's also a mass download option under the wrench icon in Library view.) Anyway, you don't have to worry about moving these; you'll get them from the cloud, complete with shelving info.

The second category is almost as easy. Assuming all of your DRM-locked books are all in your Adobe Digital Editions (ADE) library, just connect your reader, let ADE detect it, and transfer them to the new reader through ADE. You may also be able to just copy the encrypted books onto the card, relying on the common Adobe key (the device's has to match the computer) to handle the decryption...but that means finding your ADE library folder so you can get at the files directly. Not hard, just a minor hassle. Still, if ADE won't let you copy to the card, it's worth the trouble. On Win7, I believe ADE has its own folder inside Documents.

The third category is profoundly easy, since there's no automated anything. Odds are that you downloaded the unprotected files with your computer and kept them on your hard drive anyway; all you have to do now is copy them to the card. Windows Explorer does that just fine. Just put the card in the reader, connect it to the computer, and two drive letters will appear. One is the card, the other the reader. Drag, drop, eject, and enjoy.

That's the basic "how." See my next message for tips and tricks...
Rev. Bob is offline   Reply With Quote