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Old 03-06-2013, 02:14 PM   #34
fantasyfan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sun surfer View Post
Since we're discussing honest evaluations of literary merit here, I would actually say that based on their blurbs, almost none of the nominations this month seem especially literary. But I will qualify that by saying that they do all seem like non-fiction books of the highest standard, and that literary non-fiction is trickier than other literature, so this month is one of the trickiest.

This isn't something I've been thinking all during nominations. I've blithely enjoyed the nominations so far, and only thought of it on reading the quoted posts. And, whichever book wins, I'm going to enjoy reading. But perhaps, I could add a guiding sub-header to the Non-Fiction category for next time, something like "Experiences and observations, artistically and eloquently written" (any other suggestions welcome).
Thanks for sharing your thoughts Sun Surfer. They are interesting and cogent. {Though I do differ a bit with your conclusions}

Out of curiosity would you consider The Path To Rome by Hilaire Belloc to be an example of literary non-fiction as you conceive the genre?

I mention this particular book because it is written in language which frequently is tailored expressly for literary effect when describing certain states of mind--an example being the famous mystical Alps sequence. The article in Wikipedia states of it:

"More than a mere travelogue, 'The Path to Rome' contains descriptions of the people and places he encountered, his drawings in pencil and in ink of the route, humor, poesy, and the reflections of a large mind turned to the events of his time as he marches along his solitary way. At every turn, Belloc shows himself to be profoundly in love with Europe and with the Faith that he claims has produced it."

I think that a fair description of this book which I find creates a kaleidoscope of thought and feeling.

Would this type of book be more what you had in mind? {And yes, I might be thinking of it the next time we get to this category! }

Last edited by fantasyfan; 03-06-2013 at 02:31 PM.
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