View Single Post
Old 02-24-2013, 05:59 PM   #8
rplantz
Member
rplantz ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.rplantz ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.rplantz ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.rplantz ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.rplantz ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.rplantz ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.rplantz ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.rplantz ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.rplantz ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.rplantz ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.rplantz ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.
 
Posts: 18
Karma: 493474
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Northern California
Device: Acer A500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frotz View Post
In general, the EPUB format isn't very conducive at all to math, code listings, and figures. EPUB3 somewhat remedies these problems by using math markup from HTML5. The big problem is that there are very few devices and programs available to read EPUB3.
Yeah, that's what I finally figured out. I think the basic rule when wanting to publish in the EPUB format is to think "HTML" (as you point out, not HTML5 yet).

There is some irony here. When I first started writing my book (1999) I did it in HTML, thinking that students (especially computer science students) would like to read online. However, they printed the pages, using up lots of paper and toner in our labs. That's when I converted to LaTeX and sold print copies through the campus bookstore (at cost - no royalty to me). Now that I've published it through Lulu, the pdf version accounts for 90% of the sales. Students much prefer the electronic version so they can read it on their mobile devices. If I had stayed with my original plan (HTML, online) the conversion to EPUB would have been trivial. Oh well, I learned a lot about LaTeX.
rplantz is offline   Reply With Quote