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Old 02-24-2013, 04:45 PM   #7
Frotz
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Join Date: Jan 2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rplantz View Post
I spent several months last year researching how to produce an epub version of my textbook that I wrote with LaTeX. It's a book on programming in assembly language so has lots of math, code listings, and vector graphics. I came to the conclusion that I would have to "dumb down" the look of the equations, listings, and graphics to such a point that it meant essentially re-writing the book. I gave up and finally published it in pdf and paperback. I will say that LaTeX made it very easy for me to tailor the pdf version to ereaders by making small, uniform margins (no gutter), hyperlinked cross-references, and syntax coloring for code listings.

If I write another book, I will not use LaTeX. I love it, but there is no good path to epub. Since I have Office, I will probably just use Word.
In general, the EPUB format isn't very conducive at all to math, code listings, and figures. EPUB3 somewhat remedies these problems by using math markup from HTML5. The big problem is that there are very few devices and programs available to read EPUB3.
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