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Old 08-29-2008, 11:27 AM   #1
Dr. Drib
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Ellis, Edward Sylvester: The Hunters Of The Ozark (Illus). v1, 29 Aug 2008

I don’t have much information on this. It's part of a series of three titles, I beleive, and was originally published in 1887. If you like early American Literature, then you may enjoy this novel which is part of the The Deerfoot Series. I was attracted to it because many members of my family live at the foot of the Ozark Mountains in northern Arkansas.

Here's something about the book, taken from the internet:

“The date and events set out in this first volume of a series of three, is at the close of the eighteenth century in the southwestern part of the present state of Missouri, but which was then a part of the vast territory known as Louisiana. Though the town of St. Louis had been settled some years earlier, there were only a few pioneer settlements scattered through the almost limitless region that stretched in every direction from the Mississippi River. Greville was such a settlement south of St. Louis and its settlers numbered about two hundred, including men, women and children. Each autumn a party of hunters and trappers from Greville made regular visits to the Ozark Mountains, about one hundred miles to the south, for the purpose of gathering furs. This autumn the group included George Linden, Rufus Harding and James Bowlby. Their plan was to be in the camp in the mountains until spring but James Bowlby would be injured and that injury would set the scene for this story. Fred Linden, George Linden's sixteen year old son would be sent a message by his father, through Deerfoot, a young Shawanoe warrior to join them for the hunt. Fred says goodby to his mother and sister and sets out afoot to become a member of the hunting party in the Ozarks. He will surprisedly be joined along the way by his best friend, fifteen year old Irish orphan, Terry Clark. Their trek south is of high suspense and personal danger and requires the intercession of the masterful Shawanoe warrior, Deerfoot on numerous occasions.”

I hope you enjoy it.

Don
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Last edited by Dr. Drib; 08-29-2008 at 11:43 AM. Reason: Added "The" to title
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