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Old 02-18-2013, 09:26 AM   #4
SteveEisenberg
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SBT View Post
...in which case, when creator or contributor is anonymous, the copyright extends for 50 years from year of publishing, does it not?
Um, I don't know if it would better here if I hadn't googled this, but the translators are apparently Benjamin W. Huebsch and Helmut Ripperger. I say apparently because, although I have not examined the physical book, the lack of library catalog entry mentions of the translator, and of course what you say in #3 above, leads me to think that the translator(s) are not mentioned inside the book.

WorldCat gives a date of death for Benjamin W. Huebsch of 1964:
http://www.worldcat.org/title/b-w-hu...=brief_results

This would imply Canada copyright expires, I'm afraid, on January 1, 2015.

As for Helmut Ripperger, I couldn't find a firm source for his date of death, but, well, there was a gentleman of that name who died in New York -- the location of the Viking Press -- in 1974:

http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/s...gss=seo&ghc=20

Does that mean it's still under copyright even in life + 50 countries like Canada, and certainly under copyright in life + 70 countries like Norway? Maybe not. Read this:

http://www.wipo.int/treaties/en/ip/b...tml#P127_22000

The question seems to be -- did the anonymous Viking Press translators later disclose their identity? Or was their identity only discovered after their death, perhaps by a scholar examining an archive? The answer could turn on the legal definition of disclosure. That I don't know.

There's no question, in my mind, that archive.org and SBT acted in good faith. Or that MobileRead should take it down if one of the children of the translators write in to object. Beyond that, and the certainty it is under copyright in the United States, I'm flummoxed.

EDITED: Author and then-anonymous translator:


Last edited by SteveEisenberg; 02-18-2013 at 10:08 AM.
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