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Old 02-17-2013, 08:28 AM   #917
Kretzer
out of depth
Kretzer can differentiate black from dark navy blueKretzer can differentiate black from dark navy blueKretzer can differentiate black from dark navy blueKretzer can differentiate black from dark navy blueKretzer can differentiate black from dark navy blueKretzer can differentiate black from dark navy blueKretzer can differentiate black from dark navy blueKretzer can differentiate black from dark navy blueKretzer can differentiate black from dark navy blueKretzer can differentiate black from dark navy blueKretzer can differentiate black from dark navy blue
 
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Posts: 50
Karma: 13490
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Austria, near Lake Constance
Device: iPad2, iPhone 5, Kindle3 3G
Quote:
Originally Posted by Faterson View Post
I disagree. It's fantastic to have the exact (and very poetic, at the same time) colour nomenclature at our fingertips in Marvin. I get a thrill activating a "Battleship Grey" or "Schoolbus Yellow" font colour in Marvin now. A "colour-picker" is a technocratic, non-poetic solution.
Oh well. I also found the names nice to read, but that doesn't help me to find the best colour to suit my liking. There is a time and place for poetry ... a colour picker can also be efficient, flexible and technically elegant but as I said, it's a minor issue for me.

Quote:
That's just your private perception, Kretzer.
Of course. I am under the impression that I cleary label my personal opinion as such and that *I* am not trying to pronounce them as absolute truths or impose my preferences on everybody else.
For me it's nearly impossible to read "light on dark", also in print, but that doesn't mean I oppose "night mode" in readers as a matter of principle.
So let's agree to disagree on questions of taste.

Quote:
I think that's what I'm suggesting above, isn't it?
Fine, then we are talking about the same thing, which technically makes most sense, I think. I was just under the personal, private impression that you used the phrase "button to upload" in post 894.


Quote:
Here is how you can instantly recognize top-quality software: it can oblige every user's preferences, without inconveniencing or confusing any user.
Maybe. Offering a lot of options is a good thing, but I don't think you necessarily get a better product by trying to please everybody.
It is great that Kris is listening to all suggestions, but in the end he has to decide what to include in order to get a usable and consistent piece of software. Or what effort is justified to satisfy "every user's" need. I'm sure there will always be more individual wishes than one can reasonably fulfill.
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