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Old 02-09-2013, 11:10 AM   #60
Prestidigitweeze
Fledgling Demagogue
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It looks as though we're using the word reasonable in two different ways, both of which can apply to monetary value. As Merriam-Webster specifies (and I've only included the bit which pertains to us):

Quote:
rea·son·able
adjective \ˈrēz-nə-bəl, ˈrē-zən-ə-bəl\
Definition of REASONABLE. . . .

c : moderate, fair <a reasonable chance> <a reasonable price>
d : inexpensive
According to d., my prosaic interpretation of reasonable is correct (i.e., literally less expensive).

But according to c., the more general sense of pricing -- moderate, fair -- is also correct.

What I like about d. is that it isn't open to interpretation: A thing is either more expensive than another or it isn't.

But when it comes to pricing vs. value, the word reasonable itself turns out to be open to reasonable interpretation.

Last edited by Prestidigitweeze; 02-09-2013 at 11:17 AM.
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