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Old 02-03-2013, 07:30 AM   #19
fjtorres
Grand Sorcerer
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Now, on to the topic:
Technology can add marginal value to the reading experience through availability, user customization, user asistance (dictionaries, reference links etc) and sheer efficiency.
But books, p- or e-, are a pretty basic product not unlike the classic construction tools: there is only so much "refinement" you can pile on to a hammer or an axe before it becomes something other than a hammer or an axe.

The reading experience itself is pretty fundamental: eyes meet words on a surface. Much effort is being expended exploring the bounds of what current or near-term technology can do for reading. But a lot of the efforts being tried to "evolve" reading are simply creating new derivative products that might be useful and worthy but that aren't really books. And a lot of the experiences they facilitate aren't really reading, though reading may be involved.
"There be dragons" out there.
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