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Old 01-09-2013, 08:26 AM   #2
mzmm
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mzmm has not lost his or her sense of wonder.mzmm has not lost his or her sense of wonder.mzmm has not lost his or her sense of wonder.mzmm has not lost his or her sense of wonder.mzmm has not lost his or her sense of wonder.mzmm has not lost his or her sense of wonder.mzmm has not lost his or her sense of wonder.mzmm has not lost his or her sense of wonder.mzmm has not lost his or her sense of wonder.mzmm has not lost his or her sense of wonder.mzmm has not lost his or her sense of wonder.
 
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Device: iPad, Kindle Touch, Sony PRS-T1
if you're trying to validate HTML5 as XHTML 1.1 then it's not going to work.

what you've created is an XHTML5 document (XML + HTML5), and because you likely don't have a <!DOCTYPE html> in the document, W3C is going to guess that it's XHTML 1.1/1.0 because of the <?xml ...> declaration, and throw errors when it encounters HTML5 elements.

W3C validator doesn't auto-detect or allow you to select XHTML5 to validate against, so a way around this is to set the Doctype to HTML5 (Experimental) from the dropdown menu and run it that way, although this will only let you know that you've created a valid (or invalid) HTML5 document. however, if you're using anything related to the epub namespace (ie, <a epub:type="noteref" ...>) it's still not going to pass W3C.

what's more important, i think, is running it through epubcheck to verify that it's a valid epub, since that validator is going to be tailored to the epub specs.

still figuring all this out myself, so if anyone cares to correct me it's appreciated
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