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Old 01-08-2013, 10:08 PM   #6
DoctorOhh
US Navy, Retired
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BetterRed View Post
I would add to that the problem of using the same word/term to refer to different things

The most glaring example is "Tag" which is used to refer to the collection of book attributes - author, series, formats, languages, etc, and some custom columns; AND the list of words that characterise the content of the book

If the latter usage was renamed "Keywords" or the former was renamed "Attributes" that would avoid a great deal of confusion.
Excellent point. Using simpler consistent terms might benefit the average user. Barring that the creation of a glossary of terms might be something an energized user might create and contribute to the wiki documentation.

Although the latter usage is correct as the term tags is a standard term. All of the "attributes" are not tags and only tangentially referred to as tags within the context that they are in the "Tag Browser," but they are not referred to as tags. Maybe the Tag browser should be renamed. I think using attributes for metadata would be confusing since the "attributes" are essentially metadata. Isn't metadata also a standard term across music, video and books.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BetterRed View Post
Someone wrote as advice to technical writers "Use not many words when few would serve, nor different words with the same meaning, nor the same word with different meanings - lest you confuse your readers"
Good advice.

Last edited by DoctorOhh; 01-08-2013 at 10:11 PM.
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