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Old 01-06-2013, 01:35 PM   #541
holymadness
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PatNY View Post
And your post betrays an astonishingly poor ability to comprehend what people say. I never said there are "Android developers" and "iOS developers" per se, lol. A great deal of developers do cross-platform work and/or are trained to do both. What I have always said is that developers are opting to develop for the Android platform in far greater numbers than they are for the iOS platform. Meaning they are investing their time more often to Android development. This is a fact. These apps do not get created spontaneously out of thin air by themselves. Someone has to create them. Anyone using common sense would understand this. And it's a fact that Google apps have been growing far far faster than iOS apps.
Earlier in the thread, you wrote: "A having more apps than B certainly does mean that A has more developers. Of course it does."

Now you wax indignant that anyone would say you claim there are more Android than iOS devs. You can't even keep your arguments straight.
Quote:
Murray postulated that it was merely porting of old iOS apps. But that's highly unlikely as most porting of old iOS apps would already have been done by now. And if it were just porting, Google apps wouldn't be more numerous than iOS apps as they are now. An example of an app where developers decided to invest their time just with Android and NOT with iOS is Calibre Companion. There is no iOS version.
Murray has given multiple reasons for the increased number of apps on Android. Your decision to focus on one while ignoring the others is not convincing.

Quote:
Tsk-tsk-tsk. Read, read, again!

No, I am arguing that developers are betting that the longer term (1-2 years) profit potential of apps is greater with Android than iOS due to the fact that the platform itself is growing faster than Apple. They are saying if they go with Apple, they may be leaving money on the table.
You are simply wrong. It is not up for discussion that developing for Android first means eschewing profits. Devs can earn 4x as much money on iOS now, or wait for an unspecified amount of time (up to two years, according to your baseless estimates) to earn the same amount of money developing for Android.

You are literally arguing that people would choose to take up to a 75% pay cut for two years as an "investment."

Quote:
Post a link to support those numbers. And make sure the data is relatively current and that you understand it yourself, lol. No hokey data like you always like to post, please.
App store revenue.
The ad revenue is in the Opera mobile network link, already posted a half dozen times.

By the way, hokey means "corny," not whatever you think it means.
Quote:
Actually, for the developers of a successful app, it can be. But it's not necessarily leisurely if the developer decides to work on an entirely NEW app while the previous ones are pulling in the dough. It's their choice.

Can you please read? PLEASE??? It's such a waste of time when you continually mischaracterize what I write. I didn't say they have to wait for 2 years for any income. Geesh, try a little harder. But I'll repeat what I wrote in my previous post -- it's industry standard that developers are paid in increments over time as their app sells. It's essentially the same whether you develop for Android or Apple. You don't get all your money up front. Only in installments as the app sells.
This is irrelevant to the subject under discussion. Whether developers are paid monthly or bi-weekly has no bearing on the amount they earn. They earn significantly less developing for Android than for iOS, so there is no reason to accept your argument that developers are primarily financially motivated to develop for Android in preference over iOS.
Quote:
LOL, I never said these ads can "only" be shown in the Opera browser. Show me where I used the word "only." You are amazing. Maybe you have dyslexia? Or are you just so upset at being proven wrong that you have to put words in other people's mouths to pretend you are correct?

--Pat
You did write "only," though you went back and edited your post to remove that word from your post. Anyone can check the timestamps, you know. The original is quoted in my reply to you.
Regardless, you are avoiding the point. Whether you write "only" or "specific to," you are claiming that this study is discussing only ads that are being displayed by the Opera browser. That has been shown to be incorrect over and over. You are denying that 80% of these ads are being shown in apps, which is quite clearly stated in the article. The other 20% are being shown in all mobile browsers, not merely Opera's.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PatNY
Regarding this report, once again you are using hokey data that you quite don't understand yourself. It's hokey because it is not current. Moreover, it shows you didn't bother to read previous posts because Murray posted a link to this same report -- only he posted the most current data/version. Here's how I replied to Murray:

As for the IDC report, it's just a survey. The fact is, these developers are going for the android platform over iOS. Also, the chart breaks out "Kindle Fire" and "Google Nexus" separately. But they are also the Android platform. So if you add up the numbers given for those two devices PLUS the numbers given for "Android Phones" and "Android Tablets" it appears that the Android platform has more overall interest."

Here is the link that Murray gave earlier:

https://s3.amazonaws.com/www.appcele...rt-Q4-2012.pdf

--Pat
Your suggestion that the developer interest for each platform should be added together to give us the "overall interest" in Android is more evidence that you don't understand basic math or statistics. The graph in question measures the percentage of surveyed developers who are 'very interested' in developing for a platform. You are suggesting that 216% of developers are very interested in developing for Android. Heh.

Last edited by holymadness; 01-06-2013 at 06:45 PM.
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