View Single Post
Old 01-03-2013, 11:50 PM   #209
NightBird
Wizard
NightBird ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.NightBird ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.NightBird ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.NightBird ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.NightBird ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.NightBird ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.NightBird ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.NightBird ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.NightBird ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.NightBird ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.NightBird ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.
 
NightBird's Avatar
 
Posts: 2,364
Karma: 3724797
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: California
Device: KPW, KF, KF HD, iPod Touch
Relative Danger by Charles Benoit is free at Apple, $.99 at the others (links from title link).

Quote:
Description
Picture a hotel room in 1948 Singapore. Picture a dispute between black marketer and thief Russell Pearce and an associate who opens fire and murders Russell Pearce. Fast forward to present-day Pottsville, Pennsylvania. Young Doug Pearce, just fired from his steady job in the brewery, has never strayed far from home. But he’s always found stories of his Uncle Russ, the family black sheep, fascinating. In comes a letter from an old friend of his dead uncle inviting him up to Toronto. Doug, at loose ends and bored with killing time, accepts. On arrival, he learns that wealthy and glamorous Edna has an agenda: she has assembled enough clues to solve the murder of Russell Pearce and to recover a legendary red diamond he was thought to be smuggling. Doug, nervous but game, agrees to play detective. How bad can it be to jet off to a glamor spot or two and have an adventure? Whoa! By the end of his first day in Casablanca, Doug knows he’s made a mistake. And while he meets people eager to help-a retired museum curator, a beautiful and self-absorbed heiress, and her elderly father, a colleague of Russell Pearce-it becomes clear that someone else is interested in Doug, someone who is also looking for the diamond. From Morocco to Egypt to Bahrain to Singapore, Doug stumbles on. And whether he’s escaping across Cairo rooftops, ducking bullets in a high-speed desert chase, or killing time in a crowded Egyptian jail cell, Doug is sure of one thing: He has no clue what he’s doing. But surely he’ll think of something as he’s propelled full circle back to Singapore and the famed Raffles Hotel. He’s definitely not 007…but will he prove to be a zero?

Winner of the Benjamin Franklin Award for Mystery/Suspense Book of the Year & Glyph Award for Best Fiction for 2005. Publishers Weekly Best Mystery of 2004. Nominated for 2005 Edgar Allen Poe Award for Best First Mystery, Barry Award for Best First Mystery, and Mystery of the Year award by ForeWord Magazine
The Arsenic Labyrinth: A Lake District Mystery #3 by Martin Edwards is $.99 only at Amazon.

Quote:
Description
After ten years, Guy—a drifter with a taste for deception—has returned to Coniston in England’s Lake District. Local journalist Tony di Venuto is campaigning to revive interest in the disappearance of Emma Bestwick, and Guy knows what happened to her.

When Guy tips off the newspaperman that Emma will not be coming home, DCI Hannah Scarlett, head of Cumbria’s Cold Case Review Team, re-opens the old investigation. Her inquiries take her to the Museum of Myth and Legend and to the remote and eerie Arsenic Labyrinth—a series of stone tunnels used to remove arsenic from tin ore.

Meanwhile, historian Daniel Kind is immersing himself in the work of John Ruskin, whose neighbors created the Arsenic Labyrinth. A shocking discovery made against the stunning backdrop of the Lake District in winter makes it clear to Hannah that there is more than one mystery to solve, and she turns to Daniel for help in untangling the secrets of the past….
Big Wheat: A Tale of Bindlestiffs and Blood by Richard A. Thompson is $.99 everywhere (links from title link).

Quote:
Description
The summer of 1919 is over, and on the high prairie, a small army of men, women, and machines moves across the land, bringing in the wheat harvest. Custom threshers, steam engineers, bindlestiffs, cooks, camp followers, and hobos join the tide. Prosperous farmers proudly proclaim “Rain follows the plow,” meaning that the bounty of the land will never be exhausted. Everywhere, people gleefully embrace the gospels of progress and greed. The threshing season is on. But there is also an evil upon the land. A killer who calls himself the Windmill Man believes he has a holy calling to water the newly plucked earth with blood. For him, the moving harvest is a target-rich environment, an endless supply of ready victims. He has been killing for years now and intends to kill for many more. Who could stop him? Nobody even knew he existed. Until now. A young man named Charlie Krueger also follows the harvest. Jilted by his childhood sweetheart and estranged from his drunkard father, he hopes to find a new life as a steam engineer. But in a newly harvested field in the nearly black Dakota night, he has come upon a strange man digging a grave. And in that moment, he has become the only person who can stop the evil, if he lives long enough. For the killer knows his name and his wanderings, and he, too, is now a target. When next they meet, one of them will have to die.

Big Wheat is a 2012 Minnesota Book Awards finalist for Best Genre Fiction
Past Imperfect: A John McIntire Mystery #1 by Kathleen Hills is free at Apple, $.99 elsewhere.

Quote:
Description
A grizzled Lake Superior fisherman with a massive allergy to bees dies very early one morning alone on his boat. Was he stung to death? John McIntire, retired from a career in military intelligence and striving to regain a place in his boyhood home after 30 years away, is serving as township constable. He questions the easy verdict. The town of St. Adele has little experience with violent death — or murder. Nor does McIntire, despite fighting in two world wars. Worse, all the suspects are friends and neighbors, men and women he grew up with “talking Swede.” The dead man, last of a Norwegian family who came to raise apples in the struggling rural township sandwiched between the Huron Mountains of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula and the southern shore of Lake Superior, had no real enemies despite his gruff temper. And he had little to leave aside from a heavily mortgaged boat. So, who wanted to kill him? Saddened by violence striking Utopia, worried his British bride might cut and run, his task complicated by taciturn witnesses and six party telephone lines, the naturally humorous McIntire, while bringing a murderer to justice, struggles to evolve a new perspective on a rural community he has idealized for three decades. Rich in magnificent landscape, vivid characters stepping from a past both thoroughly Midwestern and multi-ethnic, and a secret-laden story, filled with laughter and warm insights, Past Imperfect offers a new voice of great promise reminiscent of the debuts of Steve Hamilton, A Cold Day in Paradise, and William Kent Krueger, Iron Lake.
Carnage on the Committee: A Robert Amiss/Baroness Jack Troutbeck Mystery #10 by Ruth Dudley Edwards is $.99 everywhere.

Quote:
Description
When the chairperson of the prestigious Knapper-Warburton Literary Prize dies in suspicious circumstances, Robert Amiss (the token sane member of the judging panel) wastes no time in summoning Baroness “Jack” Troutbeck to step into the chair.

Speculation that a killer may be targeting the judges worries the baroness not in the slightest—it’s the prospect of immersing herself in modern literature that fills her with dread. But noblesse must oblige, even when it means joining the ranks of the superciliati sitting in judgement of the literati.
With the baroness at the helm, the judges resume the task of whittling away at the short-list. But the killer, too, has resumed work and is whittling away at the judges one by one….

In deplorable taste and wickedly funny, this, the tenth in the Robert Amiss series, will consolidate the author’s reputation for scurrilous humor.
NightBird is offline   Reply With Quote