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Old 01-01-2013, 02:37 PM   #2
Ninjalawyer
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I read quite a bit of scifi and do some writing in that genre and I completely agree with Kincaid.

Science fiction is more and more interested in the fiction aspect of that genre title rather than the science as authors realize that: (i) the future is becoming more and more difficult to predict; (ii) readers are often interested more in well-worn tropes of the genre than in an exploration of the philosophical implications of a future. That's all fine, but it does make the genre less interesting as it detaches itself from broader culture in favour of more inward-looking naval gazing.

This isn't to say that no scifi manages to boldly embrace the future, just that it's becoming more rare. As Kincaid notes, it is telling that the Hugo and Nebula awards have become speculative fiction awards rather than scifi awards.
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