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Old 01-01-2013, 01:36 AM   #16
bobobo1618
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Posts: 8
Karma: 7676
Join Date: Dec 2012
Device: Kobo Mini
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffR View Post
The main idea seems to be that class 6 and 10 cards have been optimised for large sequential read/write operations at the expense of small random read/writes, but much operating system performance depends on small random writes (such as updating the KoboReader sqlite database).

This comparison for example suggests that class 4 scandisk and silicon power cards are up to 100x faster than patriot class 10 cards for some small random write operations:

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/...e,3011-12.html
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffR View Post
The problem of course is that the Kobo probably has to do large sequential reads too, such as when opening a book or loading a cover image. I don't know whether the performance gain in those operations from using a class 10 card would make up for the slower random writes.
Well considering most of the random stuff is most likely asynchronous (the SQLite database will probably be in memory for reads and the Kobo won't wait for the database to be written to disk before it shows you stuff), but the sequential stuff is most likely not, I think I'll recommend going with a class 10 card... Most of the OS stuff will be 4K or over and the Class 10s are the same or better for just about everything there.

And looking at those benchmarks, avoid Kingston.
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