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Old 12-26-2012, 06:23 AM   #21
wizwor
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Quote:
Originally Posted by l_macd View Post
The problem seems to be that people are more comfortable with ebook piracy than films, music etc. I've been surprised at a few older people I know who have bought ereaders and then quite happily accepted CDs of thousands of books given to them by friends or relatives (and very few of these things contain just public domain books). To be fair they still buy new books but I've just found it quite surprising how accepting they are of all these free books.
I'm not sure people make a moral distinction between copying an ebook or a movie. It happens to be easier and less expensive to copy, store, and use ebooks than movies. If you show up at Mom's with a roku and a terabyte of movies, I'm not confident she will shoo you away out of guilt.

I don't know why it surprises you that people do not have a problem with sharing of intellectual property. Most of us were raised with public libraries and educated in public schools that do all the things Big Media calls piracy. Before cable, television was free. So was music. Sears and RadioShack made a lot of money selling devices that had no purpose except to 'pirate' these transmissions. So did TDK and Memorex. What you call piracy was then called fair use. What changed?

Instead of offering exceptional value to paying customers or educating consumers on the value of compensating content creators, Big Media has declared war on their consumers.

Things that used to be free for all and are still free for some have become excessively expensive for others, the people who benefit from this are unlikable, and risk and cost of bypassing protections are low.

It's hard to imagine how Big Media could have made things worse than they have. Instead of insisting of endless protection, they should be championing more reasonable protections. Instead of charging more for DVD+BD+Digital, then charging you again to stream or watch on cable, they should introduce a portable system of licensing that ensures you can enjoy media how you like when you like -- and price this in a way that compliance is common sense. The government should ensure that the laws apply equally to all and that the market is open to all.

That won't happen. The lawyers, politicians, and lobbyists make too much money off the existing system.

Just sayin...
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