View Single Post
Old 08-14-2008, 05:55 PM   #69
acidzebra
Liseuse Lover
acidzebra ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.acidzebra ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.acidzebra ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.acidzebra ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.acidzebra ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.acidzebra ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.acidzebra ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.acidzebra ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.acidzebra ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.acidzebra ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.acidzebra ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.
 
acidzebra's Avatar
 
Posts: 869
Karma: 1035404
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Netherlands
Device: PRS-505
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gianfranco View Post
However I disagree that there would be some narrow "tie" between eBooks and paper-books in respect to sustainability. You can sell an eBook arbitrarily many times without having to consider gathering new resources/reprinting/transporting.
I might have worded it incorrectly - I mean I can't see it. There are too many hidden costs that I can't see and factors I can't calculate. Steve made some good points about pollution, but I don't see how they wouldn't apply to the heavy industry needed to produce high-tech electronics just the same. I don't know a lot about either.

I do agree that in a world where everyone has access to a ebook reader (oh, fabjous day! Callooh! Callay!) ebooks would be a clear winner for their infinite duplication with near-zero cost trait that you've mention. But even in a best-case scenario ebook readers will be a niche market for a long time to come, IMHO.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Jordan View Post
That does not mean they can't get better: Like other recycling efforts worldwide, there's still lots of room for improvement, and great potential for cutting back waste.
For many of the more complex components the resources used to create them would have to become extremely scarce for it to be cost-effective to recycle them, and cost-effectiveness and/or scarcity is the only way you are going to get large corporations to do something there. The frames and large homogeneous parts are obviously much easier to recycle.

Last edited by acidzebra; 08-14-2008 at 06:03 PM.
acidzebra is offline   Reply With Quote