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Old 12-13-2012, 03:19 AM   #61
Blue Tyson
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Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mitford13 View Post
Raymond Chandler's Playback is $3.49 on Amazon.

Marlowe is hired by an influential lawyer he's never herd of to tail a gorgeous redhead, but decides he prefers to help out the redhead. She's been acquitted of her alcoholic husband's murder, but her father-in-law prefers not to take the court's word for it.

"Chandler wrote like a slumming angel and invested the sun-blinded streets of Los Angeles with a romantic presence:" -- Ross Macdonald
Amazingly, I found a good deal in Australia

http://www.amazon.com/Novels-Penguin...ymond+chandler

Omnibus is 9.99 :-

Raymond Chandler created the fast talking, trouble seeking Californian private eye Philip Marlowe for his first great novel The Big Sleep in 1939. Marlowe's entanglement with the Sternwood family - and an attendant cast of colourful underworld figures - is the background to a story reflecting all the tarnished glitter of the great American Dream. The detective's iconic image burns just as brightly in Farewell My Lovely, on the trail of a missing nightclub crooner. And the inimitable Marlowe is able to prove that trouble really is his business in Raymond Chandler's brilliant epitaph, The Long Goodbye.
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