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Old 12-08-2012, 05:57 PM   #8
SteveEisenberg
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Quote:
Originally Posted by frahse View Post
That is not to say that there should not be opinions or editorials, guest pieces and the like, but separate that out, and identify it plainly.
I'm looking at the left-side panel of the Washington Post via Calibre, and this is what I see:

World
National
White House
Business
Opinions
Local
Entertainment
Sports
Redskins

I find the categorization clear. If you instead use an eReader browser to go to www.twp.com (Washington Post mobile site), categories are similar.

Now, even a factual article requires some POV for fact selection. One correction for this is to label borderline opinion articles as "Analysis." A more significant correction for this is to present a range of views in potentially controversial news stories, and to have a wall between the editorial and business sides of the paper.

Quote:
Originally Posted by frahse View Post
Still there will be News Sources. The TV channels and their own line presence are one I will mention.
Television news, in the US, has tended to be, by Washington Post standards, either analysis or opinion. And it is often uncategorized. In many on-line TV news web sites, opinion pieces and factual Associated Press stories are presented side by side without any warning that one is punditry and the other an honest attempt at objectivity.

Quote:
Originally Posted by frahse View Post
I like the old journalism. The facts please.
How old are you? The old journalism I remember best is investigative -- Woodward and Bernstein, Seymour Hersh, Barlett and Steele. Some of these people are still writing for newspapers, but, relatively speaking, today's mainstream US newspaper journalism is more hard news and less analysis, if only because muckraking costs money.

Last edited by SteveEisenberg; 12-08-2012 at 06:05 PM.
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