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Old 12-04-2012, 06:46 AM   #44
rogue_librarian
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Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Europe
Device: Pocketbook Basic 613
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveEisenberg View Post
... whether there are high-production-cost genres, such as responsible, heavily researched, investigative journalism, that will decline (even more than it has already declined) without scarcity.
That's possible, but we're talking about libraries and books here, for the most part. I don't get my news from there, and I do subscribe to a daily newspaper.

Quote:
I fail to see the harm if people, who can afford it, buy the eBooks, while the rest of us wait a bit. To me, financing the production of these books through voluntary payments from the affluent, while I have to wait a bit or accept a slightly non-preferred form factor, is ideal from a social-democratic standpoint.
As I've said, I'm neither against paying for books I read as such, nor do I fail to see the need for a workable system of author compensation. I just don't think that carrying on as though nothing had changed is the best solution for any party involved, including the authors; perhaps they only ones it really seems to suit are the publishers.

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TV shows? Here they have laid off the professional writers and actors because the production cost of reality shows is much lower.
There still seems to be a market for original shows, financed via commercials, and sales via iTunes or DVDs. I can get my regular shows for free via Hulu or the station's website, as long as I'm willing to put up with a few commercial breaks (or buy the whole thing for a few dollars, or download for free if I should be so inclined.)

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... and some chapters are held back.
Not at my university. Perhaps a different licensing deal? I know our students get the full text of all the books. We just renewed our contract for an undisclosed sum for all the books from 2008 - 2013. That said, it's just an example, there are similar deals, databases etc. As a rule, librarians abhor DRM.

Quote:
DRM'd books are vastly more convenient for getting the text onto my Kindle Keyboard than the Springer model. And Overdrive doesn't hold back chapters to get me to buy the book!
Yo know what's most convenient? Exactly, no DRM at all. Nobody eber bought anything because of DRM. Sometimes people are willing to put up with it, sometimes not, but it's never a selling point for the actual users.

Quote:
I've seen this claim a few times, but I don't believe it.
Well, I do. I have a professional interest of going there from time to time, and I can tell you that between binary newsgroups, IRC and more than a handful of websites there is very little that's not out there. This is certainly true for current fiction ebooks, but not just them.
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