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Old 12-02-2012, 05:51 PM   #7
fjtorres
Grand Sorcerer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theducks View Post
As bus speed goes up, lead length and placement (cross talk) become critical. Those Daughter board type CPU's of the P2, P3 speeds are probably out for the recent generations of CPU's.


More e-waste
Again, not necessarily.
A Celeron-style minimalist daughtercard architecture would likely not be doable.
But high-speed server/mainframe multi-processor systems are still being built using modular architectures with add-in processor cards for ease of repair and upgradeability. So there is no reason why a similar architecture can't be implemented for single or dual-processor systems, *if* there is enough of a market for it. It will without question be a niche market that *will* command a premium and it may be that the demand doesn't justify it, but the technology still *allows* it. It is not a given that upgradable systems will totally vanish.

What Intel is doing is simply a reflection of the reality that the large pinouts of modern multi-core single-chip CPUs make socket design a very challenging (read: expensive) proposition. And, as pointed out above, a lot of current computers are reliable enough that doing without sockets (saving the extra development and manufacturing costs) by moving to soldered CPUs (like most consumer electronics products) will result in cheaper products for the majority of consumers that don't need upgradability.

Not everybody actually needs or wants it badly enough to pay even a modest premium. And, of course, the less people want to pay, the more it will cost those that do need it.
The real question is whether those that claim to want it are willing to pay for it.
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