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Old 11-28-2012, 02:14 PM   #11
murraypaul
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Quote:
Originally Posted by holymadness View Post
Subscription prices for The Economist and New Scientist are $2.50 per issue where I live, with advertising.
I'd rather pay less, and ignore the adverts. It isn't like TV or radio, where they present a break to the content which can't be skipped.

Quote:
To return to the mobile side of things, New Scientist doesn't offer a native reading application for phones or tablets. The Economist's isn't bad, but hasn't yet been updated for the iPhone 5 (boo).
Zinio is the answer to both those issues.
The reading app is good on both Apple and Android, and they do regular sales. Currently you can get a 2 year subscription to Newsweek for 36c per issue. (Assuming you trust Newsweek to still be around in 2 years time!)

Quote:
Still, if I recall correctly, The Economist is one of(?) the only magazines that is increasing its print revenue despite the upheaval of the publishing industry. That's very impressive, too.
It offers content and analysis which can't be found for free on the web.
If you are going to charge, you have to offer something worth charging for.
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