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Old 08-10-2008, 02:38 PM   #13
DMcCunney
New York Editor
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Quote:
Originally Posted by llasram View Post
Looks like most of his books are currently published by HarperCollins, which certainly does have an e-book presence. I haven't him express an opinion about e-books either -- I was mostly just pondering off the fact that none of his novels or collections appear to be available as e-books, including TYPU and an essay collection also published this year. There's a new paperback edition of his first novel (The Mysteries of Pittsburgh) due out next month, so maybe we'll see then...
We can hope. As mentioned, I haven't heard that Chabon is anti-ebook.

Quote:
Looks like January 2002. Is that about the right time-frame?
I'd have to Look Stuff Up, but sounds about right. Gordon had been an editor at St. Martins, and took over when Kristine Kathryn Rusch stepped down as F&SF editor, after disagreements with the then publisher (over rights issues, among other things - Kristine is a writer, and tends to take the author's side on such things.) When the publisher decided he wanted to drop F&SF and move to Florida, Gordon bought the title. It seems to be working out for him thus far.

(Gordon is also notable for a damn near eidetic memory about submissions he's read. He can still give detailed critiques of stories he read and rejected for F&SF several years after the fact. It would be unlikely that another editor remembered a submission at all.)

Quote:
You're probably right... My logic was that SF-reader would probably be more e-book-friendly, and thus market pressure would put more SF in e-book form, but it probably doesn't work that way for major general presses.
You'd like to think so, but a major press is unlikely to treat one genre significantly different from the rest. From their point of view, it will be about business model and process, and whether they want to be in ebooks at all.

Producing ebooks requires changes to the existing workflow and procedures, and also raises the question of how they sell them. Most publishers aren't set up to deal with individual customers. I think that's a reason for Amazon having as much content for the Kindle store. They already have the developed infrastructure to sell to the consumer, and offer a secure DRM format. The publisher can treat them like they do any other wholesaler or big retail chain.
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Dennis
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