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Old 11-24-2012, 05:42 PM   #7
jabberwock_11
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Posts: 227
Karma: 1591305
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Savannah, GA USA
Device: Sony PRS-505, BeBook Neo, Kindle 3, Asus Transformer
As for the not being able to name ANY providers of this service, well I listed three in my initial post, so they are out there. As I also said in my initial post, Kindle's cloud reader and the Kindle service in general do not meet my needs.

As to the idea that most people do not do most computing online, well that is a quaint one. Outdated and myopic, but quaint. You yourself are online reading and responding to this post. Just the fact that you are on this site shows at least some connectivity. The vast majority of mobile operating systems do very little WITHOUT being online. PC sales are way down while laptop/tablet/smart phone sales are way up, so developing mobile solutions is a huge deal for most system developers. WiFi is EVERYWHERE in the developed world and nearly as accessible in the developing world. McDonalds, coffee shops, unsecured private nodes, hell even most department stores offer free WiFi. I lived in a wilderness survival training camp for two years that was nearly fifty miles from any other inhabited area...and guess what? We had WiFi too. My grandmother lives in rural Michigan up in the U.P. and she has a WiFi connection. Most state and federal parks have WiFi. I could go on, but why bother? If you are anywhere near a town in North America you already know that what I am saying is true. I have lived in forty or so different cities all over the world and from the time WiFi started popping up until now I have never had a hard time finding a hot spot. There is a reason for that. Setting up mobile networks is easier and cheaper than setting up traditional ones. There are even cities rolling out neighborhood wide and city wide WiFi networks for their residents.

Cloud services are used for a lot more than just syncing across platforms. Streaming services such as Netflix, Rhapsody, Pandora, and Amazon Instant Video are good examples of the way this sort of technology can be used. I know at least a dozen folks and several organizations who store nearly all of their data on cloud drives, because it is easier, cheaper, and infinitely more portable. The point is that being online is no longer something that happens here and there, it is happening all of the time and for those who were born in the mid to late 90s the idea of not being online is so foreign that they don't even think about cloud drives as revolutionary. For people growing up right now universal connectivity is just another fact of life (of course they are the same ones who seem surprised when stuff they post on Facebook comes back to bite them on the ass...so who knows).

Sigh, I seem to have become distracted, but none of the posts so far seem to answer my initial question. Maybe this is not the right forum for this question after all. Anybody who can give me a little bit of direction would be great.

Last edited by jabberwock_11; 11-24-2012 at 05:48 PM.
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