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Old 11-24-2012, 06:54 AM   #1
roger64
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Different ways of writing small-caps

Hi

It may sound as naive questions. Sorry for this.

I have been using small-caps for some time already with Linux Libertine. They have a dedicated small-cap font and so, the font-family designation is all that we need either for the word processor or the css.

I have seen other fonts where things seem to be a little different and not so basic.

For Linux Libertine G (G for Graphite), the regular font encompass also the smallcaps. You can write them on a word processor adding smcp=1 to the font-family name or you also can use a typography bar. I guess the first way could be used in the css, even if it does not look very convenient.

I could also try not long ago a GaramondPro-Regular.otf in one EPUB. I looked at the Adobe notice. They report that the regular font has, among many other things, a small-cap capability. I do not know how to write them with a word processor and with the css. I understand we can do everything and more using InDesign but I do not have this program. For the latter, is this the time to use the 'font-variant:'small-caps'?

Has somebody some experience to share on this?
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