View Single Post
Old 11-21-2012, 01:29 AM   #46
rkomar
Wizard
rkomar ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.rkomar ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.rkomar ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.rkomar ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.rkomar ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.rkomar ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.rkomar ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.rkomar ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.rkomar ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.rkomar ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.rkomar ought to be getting tired of karma fortunes by now.
 
Posts: 1,608
Karma: 4122230
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Vancouver, BC, Canada
Device: PRS-505, PB 902, PRS-T1, PB 623
Quote:
Originally Posted by j.p.s View Post
Doesn't the same reasoning apply to the multiple lengthening of copyright terms in the US during the previous century?
I could easily argue that changing technology is leading to lengthening copyright terms. It's all about controlling the market. In a sense, longer copyright terms _do_ increase "innovation" because they keep older works off the market and out of competition with new (controlled) works. That becomes even more important when anyone with a scanner and a computer can reintroduce an old work that has gone out of copyright and compete for readers' time. The IP landlords want their rent payments, and they'll do what they can to stop you from leaving your plot.

I don't see how any of the producers would gain that much from a shorter copyright term, whatever the technology. Sure, our culture would benefit, but nobody seems to argue for that much anymore. It's all about money.
rkomar is offline   Reply With Quote