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Old 11-18-2012, 03:36 PM   #400
BoldlyDubious
what if...?
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Join Date: Feb 2011
Device: paper & electrophoretic
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hellmark View Post
Part of the issue too is you'd have to essentially go against preexisting case law, and written law, to set a different amount for the fines, or else things could get exorbitant.
Yes, drastically lowering the amount of the fine seems necessary to me. Nowadays fines are set at horribly high values because everyone knows that the probabilitiy of being caught at illegally uploading files it's almost negligible. So the thing that publishers are trying to do is terrorize people into submission, which requires suitably terrorizing punishments. Such high fines have (only) a symbolic value, and publishers know that perfectly well.
With my "social DRM" scheme, getting a fine for illegal distribution is not impossible (if you share carelessly), so the fine does not need a symbolic value. It gets back to the original function of fines: a warning, just as a traffic ticket. So the amount of the fine can be set at reasonable value.
By the way, publishers will be the first to want reasonably low values, otherwise people will start stripping metadata from files "just in case".

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hellmark View Post
In a recent study, they found approximately 30% of all computers in the US are infected. Another study from a couple years ago showed that roughly 25% of all computers were part of a botnet.
Writing successful computer viruses or setting up botnets requires a high level of technical skills, time, and money. I don't think that someone will be interested in doing such things (and risking criminal prosecution) just to copy media files and then upload them for free on the internet.
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