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Old 11-16-2012, 02:29 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Prestidigitweeze View Post
Coder and literary editor Bernard Meisler seems to think so, according to his piece in The Atlantic Monthly:

The Real Reason Silicon Valley Coders Write Bad Software

He argues that a greater emphasis on literacy will result in better software -- that, to excel at coding and design, a software programmer must first master the art of writing lucid prose.
Most general statements are false including this one.
Most of the documentation this self taught programmer did for over 30 years was internal documentation. It was mostly done for my own benefit for maintenance purposes. I would document what in the world I was trying to do since I knew 6 months later it would take me a long time to get my mind back in the same place to change or enhance the code. I was terrible at developing external, end user documentation yet considered myself an expert working one on one with my customers teaching them how to use a system.
In my view the ability to write lucid prose may not be a requirement, but it certainly should not be considered a hindrance either.
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