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Old 11-14-2012, 10:59 AM   #321
BoldlyDubious
what if...?
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Device: paper & electrophoretic
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeD View Post
However, whilst I do not agree with BD about the overall idea, I do think that IF and it's a big IF, the book vendors do watermarking correctly, it would indeed to quite difficult to fake a book as been bought by someone else [...]
It would be a terrible to see legal customers prosecuted because the vendor failed to adequately secure their systems.
I agree with you, but it takes only a few of proved cases where legal customer gets unjustly prosecuted to discredit all subsequent accusations of illegal distribution based on using embedded metadata as evidence. So publishers would have the strongest pressure (do that or you'll die!) to do a good work.

I also want to make it clear that I don't like DRM systems of any kind, not even my hypothetical "social DRM". If everyone of us were honest and correct, no DRM (and no door locks...) would be necessary.
However, I'm trying to imagine a system that can actually work in the real (post-Internet and post-infinite digital copying possible) world for:
(1) ensuring that authors fully get the fruit of their work;
(2) avoiding that media buyers are held hostages of media distributors through abusive licensing policies.
Neither of these happen with current DRM schemes. More precisely: they fail at (1) and they intentionally do the contrary of (2).
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