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Old 11-06-2012, 04:16 PM   #38
AlPe
Digital Amanuensis
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Yeah, I was looking exactly at it...

http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc1952#section-2.2

The different bytes are exactly the timestamp, which is obviously different --- since I "modified" the file while decompressing-adding .gz-recompressing.

Still, in the process, I learnt that the dictionary was created under *nix, if the OS field was properly set

Now I wonder what I did to get 5 out of 7 to recompress EXACTLY with the same timestamp... mmm... the MTIME field description says:

Quote:
MTIME (Modification TIME)
This gives the most recent modification time of the original
file being compressed. The time is in Unix format, i.e.,
seconds since 00:00:00 GMT, Jan. 1, 1970. (Note that this
may cause problems for MS-DOS and other systems that use
local rather than Universal time.) If the compressed data
did not come from a file, MTIME is set to the time at which
compression started. MTIME = 0 means no time stamp is
available.
Ok, perhaps I forced gunzip to ignore the fact that si.html did not have .gz extension, and recompress it "as it was", hence retaining the original MTIME.
Edit: CONFIRMED, this was the reason! Meh!

Last edited by AlPe; 11-06-2012 at 04:29 PM.
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