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Old 10-22-2012, 05:17 AM   #15
fantasyfan
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I'll nominate The Dreaming Jewels by Theodore Sturgeon. Here is an effective and fair review of the book by Michael J Mazza on the Amazon website:

' "The Dreaming Jewels," a novel by Theodore Sturgeon, is a well-written and moving blend of science fiction, horror, mystery, love story, and coming-of-age tale. It tells the story of Horton "Horty" Bluett, a young boy who lives unhappily with his abusive adoptive father. The boy's only "friend" is a jack-in-the-box with glittering, jeweled eyes. To escape the abuse, Horty runs away and joins a traveling freak show, where he is befriended by an extraordinary trio of midgets. Ultimately, Horty's odyssey leads him to seek the mystery behind a strange and marvelous life form that is unlike any other species on earth.

'"Jewels" is a fascinating story. A key theme is the notion of being a "freak," an outcast. Sturgeon effectively explores the emotional ramifications of this theme, and vividly depicts his outcasts' search for love and community. He makes good use of the carnival setting in his narrative. Although the story's villainous characters are a bit shallow, the other characters are complex and well-developed.

'Other important themes in "Jewels" include education, masquerade (including gender-switching), transformation, and communication in its many forms. Sturgeon explores both individuals' desire to dominate and abuse others, as well as the capacity for love and tenderness. Sturgeon's prose style is well suited for the complex task of this book. Overall clear and economical, his prose is at times richly descriptive, at times quite poetic.

'At one point Charles Fort, the tireless documenter of strange phenomena, is mentioned in the book, and that reference is quite resonant. In "The Dreaming Jewels," Sturgeon embraces and celebrates those who are seen as weird or deviant, and discovers the humanity behind the freak show exteriors.'

The book is available for Kindle and can be purchased here: {where you can read other reviews too}

http://www.amazon.com/Dreaming-Golla...odore+Sturgeon

Last edited by fantasyfan; 10-22-2012 at 07:23 AM.
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