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Old 10-12-2012, 02:59 AM   #21
scrapking
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Posts: 467
Karma: 1073260
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Victoria, BC
Device: Kobo Vox, Kobo Glo
It's been interesting reading the back and forth about whether it's doctored and, if it's doctored, whether that's OK or not.

It seems to me that in advertising (and brand building), you want to promise as much as you can without actually ever disappointing the consumer. I can see a company with an infomercial being less concerned with managing customer expectations after the sale, they're usually one-shot wonders, but a company like Amazon doesn't have that luxury. Amazon can't afford to simply close the sale however they need to, and to heck with the consequences after the consumer gets the item.

The "Kobo Glo" and the "Nook with Glow Light" both promise to glow. No one can dispute that these devices live up to that promise.

The Amazon Paperwhite promises to be as evenly white as paper. There does seem to be some dispute about whether this device lives up to that promise. That's a problem.

Over-promising and under-delivering is never a good idea.
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