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Old 10-09-2012, 09:27 AM   #18
ProfCrash
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Apache View Post
My wife loves to do scrambles and now I know why.
Another thing I thought was affected by Dyslexia is her handwriting. I used to attribute it to her being left handed. And I have wondered if left handed people are more likely to have dyslexia. When she fills out a claim ticket for customers, I have a hard time deciphering it. She does not stay in the lines well and she can put directions anywhere on the envelope.
When she was in high school, in Texas, Dyslexia was not recognized or treated. They thought you were just stupid. Her high school counselor said she would never make it in college. She said her daughters were intelligent and struggling at The University of Texas.
My wife was accepted at the University of Texas and graduated with a dual degree in all phases of Special Ed.
She first heard of Dyslexia in one of her class courses at UT.
Apache
Her handwriting is probably affected by dysgraphia, spacial orientation, and not dyslexia. I actually used graph paper for writing in school, one letter per square and one empty square equals a space. Otherwise my writing was all over the place and the words were not seperated. I thought they were, but they were not. When I first started writing, I had to put a finger down at the end of each word and start the next word on the other side of my finger.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kumabjorn View Post
Thanks for all the replies, I did not know that dyslexia is so tied into the alphabet. Growing up with it and beginning to study different languages I was always impressed with how logical and easy the alphabet seemed to other orthographies, hence it seemes illogical that people had difficulties with it compared to those more difficult script systems. You learn something new every now and then. Wonder if those old Greeks would have started writing right to left if they knew what we know today?
Dysnumeria is dyslexia with numbers. I have that one too. Numbers move around for me and reverse all the time. I had awful math scores until one of my teachers took the time to go through my math problems and redo the answer when I reversed numbers and the like. All the sudden it was clear that I understood the concepts but that the numbers would not stay put for me. I ended up teaching statistics and game theory as a grad student and visiting professor. I got the concepts but still struggle with math by hand because of dynumeria. Give me a stats package and I am a happy camper.
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