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Old 10-05-2012, 09:02 PM   #4
st_albert
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st_albert calls his or her ebook reader Vera.st_albert calls his or her ebook reader Vera.st_albert calls his or her ebook reader Vera.st_albert calls his or her ebook reader Vera.st_albert calls his or her ebook reader Vera.st_albert calls his or her ebook reader Vera.st_albert calls his or her ebook reader Vera.st_albert calls his or her ebook reader Vera.st_albert calls his or her ebook reader Vera.st_albert calls his or her ebook reader Vera.st_albert calls his or her ebook reader Vera.
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hitch View Post
I'll also state, utterly apart from DRM issues, that having books downloadable/for sale/whatever on your own site creates a massive customer service burden. If your clientele is sophisticated, in a techhie way, great. If they're not--if they're typical end-users--prepare yourself for the onslaught of people who, apparently, have never downloaded anything from a browser who will call you in a snit because they can't figure out how to load a book in ADE. Trust me, the CSR burden alone is worth paying Nook or iBooks or Kindle to do.

Just my $.02, and not worth what you just paid for it,

Hitch
That's been our experience too, more or less. But mostly the unsophisticated users (the technical Unix term is "lusers") tend to buy from the distributors (e.g. Amazon, B&N) rather than from the website. Then too, our books are non-drm, so the typical question is "How do I side load this file you sent me?" The boss has canned e-mail responses for that, so it's no big deal.

There is once in a while the defiantly, willfully ignorant customer who refuses to follow directions to learn how to open a pdf file, but for them we have print books.

I guess it takes all kinds...
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