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Old 10-05-2012, 08:39 AM   #182
Mrs_Often
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EldRick View Post
Instead, try taking each line in chunks - start with 2-3 words, then blip to the next two or three, move on to the next chunk, etc. As you practice, you will take in a line in fewer and fewer pieces, with more words/chunk. That's when you gain the speed.
Thanks again EldRick! I forgot about that one.

Quote:
Originally Posted by EldRick View Post
sombreastre - I assure you that it works for anyone who doesn't have to spell out the words to understand them - the whole idea is to get away from subconscious vocalization. It's not just a scam.
I just practiced your "blipping" whilst reading the rest of this thread. It was extremely difficult to concentrate on the words instead of remembering to blip... I was concentrated on what I was doing instead of reading the content, so I kept having to re-read everything I'd already "blipped." And, that annoying vocalisation won't bugger off. If I don't do it, I don't know what I'm reading.

Oh well, I guess it's up to a lot of practise. I'll keep trying, I hope I'm more patient this time!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nightyume View Post
As Mrs. Often says, weird is good. Normal is boring (it's our eccentricities and peculiarities which make us interesting).
That's exactly what I always say!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nightyume View Post
As for the speed reading. I used to be able to do something with the whole page absorption thing but with diagrams and with auditory stimuli (I could just sit and absorb six conversations at once) but it's like any skill, it gets rusty with disuse.
Interesting! I'd love to examine brain activity and such with people doing such absorption tricks. Makes one wonder how small a percentage of brain function we actually use in day to day life.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nightyume View Post
As for more "normal" speedreading, I am sometimes able to read quite a bit faster and process all the information and forget about the imaginary auditory accompaniment ringing out inside my head. But I have to say is that I enjoy books a lot more when I don't speed read. Books are all about the storytelling, which is like theatre, creating a setting, little by little as the lights come on and illuminate the different parta of the stage. Revealing to us the characters while the shadows hide things unbeknownst to us and villains hide in the wings.
I can imagine!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nightyume View Post
But I do agree that speed reading could be quite beneficial as a mandatory course for students though you could only give them credit for participation and not actually grade them (how unfair would it be to punish someone with a low grade just for not having their brains like so, not to mention the torture such a course would be for anyone with dyslexia).
I agree. So useful. The time I wasted re-reading sentences when I was revising because I was reading so slow I got bored and started thinking about other things... Sigh. But the dyslexia... I think speed-reading can help there too. I did one speed-reading, mind-mapping and memory training course of a few days yeeears ago, and the instructor was actually dyslexic. He used to read about 75 wpm and decided he had to do something about it. So he taught himself to speed-read and finished his psychology degree reading books and books at >800 wpm with time to spare. Again it could differ per person, but if this speed-reading is trainable, it might be useful to the dyslexic as well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nightyume View Post
And just to pretend that I am not promulgating an off topic conversation...
Agh. I'm being horrible topic-wise to this thread. Perhaps I should make a new thread to accommodate this interesting conversation.
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