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Old 09-30-2012, 04:10 PM   #163
Prestidigitweeze
Fledgling Demagogue
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ravensknight View Post
I'd like to hear from people who have not had a smart phone before and decided to jump in with the I5.
I have a tracfone, but am seriously thinking of moving up. And I would like to know what a newbie thinks of the I5 before I put down that kind of money...
It sounds like you're privileging the newbie aspect for reasons you consider practical, but where's the real benefit? I can understand not wanting to put up with the factions that promote or malign Apple, but not every veteran has sworn their allegiance. Do you believe that a novice would be more objective than, say, a reviewer, or are you assuming their experience will be closer to yours because they hadn't owned such a device until recently?

I'd argue they're less likely to be a barometer simply because any smartphone is going to seem tremendous to someone who's never had the pleasure of owning one before. If I'd never used any other smartphone, I'd be thrilled and amazed by the iP5.

Which is not to say the iP5 is lacking, esp. for someone who uses it daily (versus my twenty minutes) and loves its UI and aesthetic. I'm just saying that a newbie might also be thrilled and amazed by the Motorola Photon, and that's hardly a bleeding edge phone when compared to your other options.


As to your question about hands-on experience:

The biggest selling points of the past two and a half iP iterations have been the screen and ecosystem.

When I first played with an iPhone 4, the readability of the Retina screen was such an upgrade from that of my Galaxy S (and of the original iPad) that I was tempted buy it right then. Readability is a factor that might concern you as a lover of ebooks.

Something seemed missing (and disappointing) when I played with the iP5 at the Sprint Store. To be fair, I'll try to visit an Apple Store tonight to see whether any of the standard apps or features were absent.

En ce moment, the iP4-5 and the 920 seem to be the smartphone kings of non-fatigued reading.

And now back to the reviews!

This just-posted review of the advantages and disadvantages of iOS6 seems more fair to me than its title might suggest. Before I even read it, I was thinking I might have settled for a pre-iP4S without a software update.

iOS6 Problems Kill Its Features

The same web publication offers a comparison of the Galaxy S3 and the iPhone 5, but I don't know whether or not that's been posted already, nor do I know anything about the integrity of "Dansway Communications LTD" or its founder, Daniel Chubb.

In the case of the Nokia 920 and the iPhone 5, I'm thinking that the next few months will tell us whether the features and innovations outweigh the bugs and user limitations. Android 4.1 has been vetted, but if 4.2 had just been released and were significantly different, I'd say the same thing about it.

On the maps issue, Barron's quotes Ben Reitze of Barclays Capital as saying this:

Quote:
We believe that Apple can improve its offering with software updates over time and that the issues seem more significant overseas.
Something worth considering depending on where you live. It would also be useful to know exactly where in the States the map coverage is best and worst.

Last edited by Prestidigitweeze; 09-30-2012 at 05:16 PM.
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