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Old 09-30-2012, 02:39 PM   #12
Serpentine
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Posts: 416
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Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Cape Town, South Africa
Device: Kindle 3
Without knowing the test conditions there's absolutely no way to know. So much depends on the environment, calibration and configuration of the lcd, while the e-ink just requires external light. Under lab conditions the lcd will be far easier to read due to low specularity, high diffuse high output lighting, while for everyday reading in a lounge or bedroom you're never going to have those conditions.

I'm also not too sure how you'd see a different result from the objective testing.

Quote:
It is not the technology itself, but rather the image quality that seems crucial for reading. Compared to the visual display units used in the previous few decades, these more recent electronic displays allow for good and comfortable reading, even for extended periods of time.
It's not the technology, it's the technology? 'Recent', does that mean IPS flavours? high pixel density? wled?. I am astounded to find that image quality is beneficial, after all this time it turns out that people with bad eyes were not just pretending that they had trouble reading. Water = wet; mind = blown.
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