Thread: Which Are You?
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Old 09-27-2012, 01:52 PM   #53
Harmon
King of the Bongo Drums
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Actually, for me it's "Apple whenever possible" rather than "Apple all the way". The fragmented hardware market resulting from allowing Apple, Amazon et. al. to tie their software and content to specific pieces of hardware guarantees that none of the resulting ecosystems will fully satisfy everyone's - or anyone's - needs, except for those people who don't really need ecosystems in the first place and can take a piece of each and be happy.

In my case, I'm happy with the Apple hardware ecosystem, except for its failure to include an eInk based EBR, or any reasonable substitute (such as a 7 inch lcd in an EBR form factor). I am also fairly happy with the software and content systems, though now & then I hear of an app I'd like on another system that's not available or is better than its analog on Apple.

On the hardware side, Apple rules, albeit at premium prices. On the software side, Apple is the best (meaning easiest) for anyone who doesn't care to spend time tweaking around with other systems. On the content side, Apple seems to accomodate the most content from other sources with the least bother.

To some extent, all this stuff is a matter of personal comfort. My introduction to computers was back in the early 80s (remember the Wang?) and my office stabilized on IBM based computers during that decade. I learned how to manipulate the OS, and deal with hardware, to the point where my knowledge was about as good as any of our tech support staff's. Then, in 1991, I spent a month at a place that had Macs, and those computers just made immediate sense to me. Kind of like finding a store where all the clothes fit right without alterations.

And this comfort level has persisted ever since.
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