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Old 09-16-2012, 05:19 PM   #10
fantasyfan
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Posts: 828
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Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Ireland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bookworm_Girl View Post
I found it easier to read this book in short segments, alternating it with another book. Maybe it was the writing style necessary to represent the teenage voice. It certainly does bring back memories of the social pressures and awkward years of middle school, which I suppose must be universal whether male / female or British / American. I enjoyed the 80s flashback and the British slang. I also enjoyed the big sister and little brother interactions, and the age difference helped magnify the coming of age story. I liked how the last chapter had the same title as the first chapter as the story has progressed over the course of a year.
I'm also reading it in tandem {with Amelia Edwards' fab book}.

The very perceptive points you make above exactly reflect the feeling I got when reading it--I live in Ireland but my boyhood was spent in Pennsylvania and I think that anyone can relate to those years when reading the book, regardless of where they live.
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