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Old 09-15-2012, 03:14 PM   #31
mgmueller
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Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Augsburg (near Munich), Germany
Device: 26 Readers, 44 Tablets
Quote:
Originally Posted by DiapDealer View Post
Correction. It's the only way they can make a point about pricing problems where their words will appear "in lights," so to speak.
I'm not sure, whether I can agree to your logic.

First of all: No big corporate, especially highly successful ones such as Apple or Google, will adjust their pricing based on emails, reviews and actions like that. They will act according to their business plan and carefully analyse sales figures, target groups and stuff.

Second of all: I'm pretty sure, the people nagging in those reviews are nowhere near the focus groups of Google or Apple.
a.) Corporates won't care much about people, nagging about book prices and maybe buying 10 books per year. They will focus on buyers, spending hundreds of Dollars per month, not the ones nitpicking about cents. As always: The 20% that generate 80% of the profits.
b.) We can be sure: The pricing is no coincidence. It's based on highly specific analyses and statistics. There are no accidents. And the prices are no sole decision of Steve Jobs and the likes but are based on historic data of the publishing industry for example over decades.

And last but not least:
I don't get the feeling, those reviewers actually have a cause and want to change things.
Their tone is more of the quality of "why doesn't everybody drive a Porsche".
If one wants to change things, he wouldn't make nonsensical comparisons such us "the price for renting the movie is about the same as buying a used DVD".
Statements like that are about as valid as arguments like "I can drive from Munich to Berlin by train for 40 Euro. Why is a Mercedes so expensive then? Way too expensive".
All true. But there are aspects such as convenience: Downloading a movie might be easier and more convenient than buying a DVD. And I can watch the movie everywhere on every gadget instead of needing a DVD player. And why compare to a used product?
Someone making such simplified statements as mentioned in my original post doesn't want to change anything. And they're not interested in the product at all. They just want to address their aggression.

When planning my last vacation, I stumbled over a hotel asking for 500 Euro per night.
I couldn't see, why they ask that much. Neither location nor interior seemed to allow for that price, not even close.
Why should I bother to discuss or question their price?
Maybe they go bankrupt in a year, maybe the owners will be billionaires by then.
Who cares?
It was worth nowhere close to 500 Euro for me, so I chose another hotel.
Problem solved, all happy.
For the original example of eBooks or movies, this would mean: If Google is too expensive, buy or rent from Apple or Amazon then. If all ask for about the same, there's probably a reason for that. And if it's still too expensive for you: Buy your DVD then, where's the problem? Or let it be altogether. Not everyone can be a house owner, not everybody can drive a Porsche, not everybody has to own an iPad.
But the problem seems to be: Most want to have everything.

Last edited by mgmueller; 09-15-2012 at 03:44 PM.
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