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Old 09-07-2012, 01:58 PM   #34
cfrizz
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Outstanding post and right on the money!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrew H. View Post
There is, however, a lot of evidence, as well as the fact that these publishers settled.

No one can predict the future. But everyone noticed how quickly book prices went up with agency, and there's no reason to assume that they will go back down.

And if most readers choose to buy their books from Amazon because of lower prices or better service or whatever - that is good for the consumer. Eliminating price competition is bad for the consumer.

Then they weren't harmed by the collusion in the first place. E-books going from $9.99 to $14.99 is, of course, only a problem if you bought a $9.99 book in the first place. If you never paid more than $2.99 for a book, then you weren't harmed when the price went from $10-$15, either. So you there's no reason you should get anything from the settlement.

The settlement also doesn't stop hunger, cure cancer, or decrease ennui. There are millions of things that the settlement doesn't do. So what?

This makes no sense. Cheaper e-books are bad because they will undercut paper books, which will cause e-book prices to rise. So the solution is to keep e-book prices at a high level so that e-book prices don't rise to a high level.

And I don't know what your point is about "world wide readers." E-book prices - book prices generally - in the US are much cheaper than those in Europe. Which is a big reason why the US has 80% of the e-book market.

And while it's true that $9.99 is going to be a big expense for someone in a third world country, so is $24.99 for the same hardback.

*Amazon* won't destroy the paper book market. If the paper book market is destroyed, it will be because consumers preferred to buy e-books.

I don't think you hate Amazon. I think you hate consumers.
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