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Old 09-04-2012, 09:56 AM   #20
QuantumIguana
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crich70 View Post
Interesting. I understand the slippers turned ruby red when the 1st book was made into a movie in 1939. Silver shoes would have been washed out on the silver screen so that Dorothy would have looked like she had no feet so the studio settled on ruby slippers.
The movie was filmed in Technicolor, and the studio wanted the slippers to really stand out, so they changed the slippers from silver to ruby. They fit in with the over the top color of everything in Oz. The book and the movie have quite a lot of differences, but both the movie and the book work.

They do differ in how Oz deals with the party's requests:

Spoiler:
In the movie, Oz gives them sybols of what they wanted, because, as the song says "Oz never did give nothin' to the Tin Man that he didn't already have; he gave the Scarecrow a diploma, a testimonial to the Tin woodman, and a medal to the Cowardly lion. In the book, he fills the Scarecrow's head with bran so he can have "bran new brains". He gives the Tin Woodman a heart made of felt and installs it into his chest. The cowardly lion he gives a bottle of courage, which was a joke based in the idea of people getting their courage from a bottle. In both the book and the movie, all three exhibit the traits that they wish to have: the scarecrow, although he doesn't know to avoid potholes, comes up with a lot of good ideas, the Tin Woodman cares greatly about people's feelings, and the Cowardly Lion goes into dangerous situations. The Cowardly Lion is more visibly scared in the movie than in the books.


I read my daughter all of Baum's original Oz books. I read her the first of Ruth Plumly Thompson's Oz books, but it just didn't seem to have the same.
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