Thread: E-book prices
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Old 08-22-2012, 07:59 PM   #17
SteveEisenberg
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JD Gumby View Post
There are no reasons other than pure greed for the ebook version (ESPECIALLY backlist) to ever cost as much as even the mass-market paperback version ($2-3 less, due to the lack of any physical manufacturing, transfer [well, there's *some*, but it amounts to well under a penny], warehousing costs, or needed space on the shelf at the storefront), nor for it to EVER, under ANY circumstances, be of any lower editing quality.
Why not the opposite? There's no reason other than pure greed for the mass-market price to be higher than that charged the relative elite who are able to pay $100 and more for an eReader.

Now, if the price is higher than I am comfortable with, I just won't buy. This means I mostly use libraries, going through Overdrive if available and paper if not.

I ordered, and just got in the mail today, Dead Men Risen: The Welsh Guards and the Defining Story of Britain's War in Afghanistan -- US$5.97 for a like-new paperback shipped from East Sussex. I presume this was remaindered by the publisher with the expectation it would retail at about that price.

The Amazon Kindle US price was 50% higher ($8.85), so I went with paper.

The Amazon UK price is 2.39 (equivalent to US$3.79). I have no moral problem with the US price being more than double the UK price. If Amazon and Quercus (the book's publisher), through some dance, jointly decide that some Americans who own eReaders can pay more than double for this particular book, they are probably right. And, if wrong, there is interlibrary loan.

To give a bit more of the tale: The US$5.97 price I paid is no longer available. I can't now find any paper copy for less then $10. So, if I was buying today, I would pay US Amazon $8.85 for the eBook. This concretely illustrates how buying used books financially helps authors and publishers. By taking the low-priced marketed-as-used copies, I, and a few others, will have pushed subsequent buyers to the higher priced spread. And that's not greed, that's good.

Last edited by SteveEisenberg; 08-22-2012 at 08:02 PM.
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